About

I'm Mike Pope. I live in the Seattle area. I've been a technical writer and editor for over 30 years. I'm interested in software, language, music, movies, books, motorcycles, travel, and ... well, lots of stuff.

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I was such an idiot just a few short years ago. But then, it's been my experience so far that no matter how old I get, I was always an idiot a few years ago.

Jerry Kindall



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Blog Statistics

Dates
First entry - 6/27/2003
Most recent entry - 6/6/2021

Totals
Posts - 2636
Comments - 2645
Hits - 2,382,935

Averages
Entries/day - 0.40
Comments/entry - 1.00
Hits/day - 363

Updated every 30 minutes. Last: 8:48 PM Pacific


  06:45 PM

Totally random.

A History of Microsoft Windows. A set of pictures (one of several published today) that shows the evolution of the Windows UI. As always happens, you look back on what we were using 10 years ago and marvel at how primitive it looks. Presumably that will always be true.

My Project Du Jour: GetAFirstLife.com. Darren Barefoot mocks SecondLife.com and gets "what I can only describe as a a proceed and permitted letter letter from Linden Labs in the comments":

In conclusion, your invitation to submit a cease-and-desist letter is hereby rejected.

[via polyglot conspiracy]

The Real Underground. The map of the London Underground is a great achievement in cartographical design. Rather than illustrating the actual geography of London's (hopelessly confusing) layout, the map conceptualizes the geography of the city and of the train routes, and thereby makes it simpler by an order of magnitude to actually use the system. The Transport Museum[1] in London has posted a Flash-y thing where you can examine the current map, its original implementation, and the true layout of the system. [via the old new thing]


[1] Just the name "Transport Museum" makes it sound like the place is a haven for the terminally geeky, but ... it's not.

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