About

I'm Mike Pope. I live in the Seattle area. I've been a technical writer and editor for over 30 years. I'm interested in software, language, music, movies, books, motorcycles, travel, and ... well, lots of stuff.

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The whole integrity of editing rests on the editor's ability, when challenged, to give a reasonable and persuasive explanation for every change in the text — and that disagreements over judgments can be worked out collegially, in discussion.

John McIntyre



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Blog Statistics

Dates
First entry - 6/27/2003
Most recent entry - 9/24/2016

Totals
Posts - 2399
Comments - 2542
Hits - 1,883,966

Averages
Entries/day - 0.50
Comments/entry - 1.06
Hits/day - 389

Updated every 30 minutes. Last: 3:19 PM Pacific


  10:25 PM

I feel somewhat odd in propagating this, but it's interesting and, for better or worse, thought provoking. Or just provocative. Or inflammatory, all depending on your viewpoint. Someone who seems to be a Microsoft employee has an anonymous blog that examines in the open the types of issues one tends to hear sotto voce, if at all. A couple of examples:
Let's say Microsoft can indeed reduce its workforce by 10%. That'd be about 5,500 flesh-and-blood individuals. We easily have that many employees we can do without. You figure each employee represents $200,000 to $300,000 cost to Microsoft each year (salary, benefits, equipment, etc etc). So, by attrition and layoff, a 10% reduction right there would save Microsoft anywhere from $1,100,000,000 to $1,650,000,000.

And this is the gift that keeps giving to the bottom line.

[...]

Looking to hire Microsoft employees? I'm looking for a smaller Microsoft. I think we can help each other.

[...]

Thing is, we have some bad folk in Microsoft. They got hired during the Big Boom before the bubble's pop. And baby, they are holding onto their jobs now with the big Microsoft like nobody's business. And they're just causing harm. Doing enough to get by, writing crappy code, doing crappy testing, and designing crappy features.

Via Mike Gunderloy.

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