About

I'm Mike Pope. I live in the Seattle area. I've been a technical writer and editor for over 30 years. I'm interested in software, language, music, movies, books, motorcycles, travel, and ... well, lots of stuff.

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The hardest thing about writing is getting yourself into a state of not not writing.

Matthew Baldwin



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Blog Statistics

Dates
First entry - 6/27/2003
Most recent entry - 9/30/2016

Totals
Posts - 2400
Comments - 2542
Hits - 1,884,864

Averages
Entries/day - 0.50
Comments/entry - 1.06
Hits/day - 389

Updated every 30 minutes. Last: 11:23 AM Pacific


  05:20 PM

In ASP.NET Web Pages/Razor, you use the @ character inside markup to mean "here be code." Like this:

<p>@DateTime.Now</p>

But suppose you want to display the @ character instead of use it to mark code? Like this:

<p>You use the @ character to mark inline code.</p>

Try that in a .cshtml page and you're rewarded with a YSOD:


(Click to embiggen)

Simple fix: escape the @ character with ... another @ character. Like this:

<p>You use the @@ character to mark inline code.</p>

This makes the parser happy.

(h/t, as usual with parser questions: Andrew Nurse)

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