About

I'm Mike Pope. I live in the Seattle area. I've been a technical writer and editor for over 30 years. I'm interested in software, language, music, movies, books, motorcycles, travel, and ... well, lots of stuff.

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To be sure, Darwin's theory of evolution is imperfect. However, the fact that a scientific theory cannot yet render an explanation on every point should not be used as a pretext to thrust an untestable alternative hypothesis grounded in religion into the science classroom or to misrepresent well-established scientific propositions.

John Jones, U.S. District Judge



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Blog Statistics

Dates
First entry - 6/27/2003
Most recent entry - 3/22/2019

Totals
Posts - 2551
Comments - 2605
Hits - 2,128,200

Averages
Entries/day - 0.44
Comments/entry - 1.02
Hits/day - 370

Updated every 30 minutes. Last: 5:17 AM Pacific


  04:44 PM

I'm reading Bruce Schneier's Beyond Fear, which concerns "thinking sensibly about security in an uncertain world," as he subtitles it. He talks generically about security -- not just computers -- and describes a framework for thinking about security in many contexts, like protecting the home, the car, your bank account, and the nation.

There's lots of thought-provoking stuff in there, and the book is recommended. Before I take it back to the library, I wanted to type out this little passage. He's talking about the security arms race that has occurred in the animal and plant kingdoms:
It's no accident that insects provide such interesting security examples. Over the eons they have tried just about everything. The techniques of attack and defense that proved to work were repeated, and the techniques that failed weren't. Because they tried them at random and stopped at the first workable solution they found, they tended to arrive at interesting and surprising solutions. It's not unusual to find insect countermeasures that are nonobvious, but effective nonetheless. Insects are good at cheating.
Here's just one way:


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