About

I'm Mike Pope. I live in the Seattle area. I've been a technical writer and editor for over 30 years. I'm interested in software, language, music, movies, books, motorcycles, travel, and ... well, lots of stuff.

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We copy editors are the skeptics, the nay-sayers, the fault-finders. We look at a text expecting to find it defective and are seldom disappointed.

John McIntyre



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Blog Statistics

Dates
First entry - 6/27/2003
Most recent entry - 11/17/2017

Totals
Posts - 2460
Comments - 2563
Hits - 1,999,326

Averages
Entries/day - 0.47
Comments/entry - 1.04
Hits/day - 380

Updated every 30 minutes. Last: 8:04 PM Pacific


  05:49 PM

Happy belated Father's Day to me.

Flight patterns. Beautful. "Data from the U.S. Federal Aviation Adminisrtation is used to create animations of flight traffic patterns and density." (Quicktime version) [via Kent Sharkey]

Bad Names. Smells like bad design spirit. Eric Lippert cleans up a lot of "crufty old code" in the .NET C# compiler and comes up with a list of function names that "smell bad" and "which could use some serious thought." Do you have any functions with these names?

The existential angst of Ichiro. A collection of quotations from Ichiro [Suzuki] of the Seattle Mariners. Sample: On how to break out of a slump: "If I'm in a slump, I ask myself for advice." [via Seattlest]

How to Clean Up a Windows Spyware Infestation. Jeff Atwood shows you (in pictures!) tools and techniques for removing spyware, including the nasty kind that keeps coming back.

Congressional hearing: tense and moody. Colleague David links to Jon Carroll, essayist for the San Francisco Chronicle, who today is delighted that the term hortatory subjunctive showed up in Congressional testimony. Synchronicity: this term has shown up twice today -- the current AWADmail sent out by Anu Garg sends contains a note from reader Victor Lund who says about the word dehort: "Dehort brings back memories of classes in classical Greek. After a few months, one learns that sentences such as Let's go! in Greek are formed with a grammatical construction known as the hortatory subjunctive, meaning, of or pertaining to exhortation." Dang, it's Greek grammar day around here!

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