About

I'm Mike Pope. I live in the Seattle area. I've been a technical writer and editor for over 30 years. I'm interested in software, language, music, movies, books, motorcycles, travel, and ... well, lots of stuff.

Read more ...

Blog Search


(Supports AND)

Google Ads

Feed

Subscribe to the RSS feed for this blog.

See this post for info on full versus truncated feeds.

Quote

The fine (and gross) points of literacy -- spelling, punctuation, grammar -- elude the vast majority of the Internet's users. To believe that J. Random Users will suddenly and en masse learn to spell and punctuate -- let alone accurately categorize their information according to whatever hierarchy they're supposed to be using -- is self-delusion of the first water.

Cory Doctorow



Navigation





<January 2018>
SMTWTFS
31123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031123
45678910

Categories

  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  
  RSS  

Contact

Email me

Blog Statistics

Dates
First entry - 6/27/2003
Most recent entry - 1/15/2018

Totals
Posts - 2475
Comments - 2570
Hits - 2,015,535

Averages
Entries/day - 0.47
Comments/entry - 1.04
Hits/day - 379

Updated every 30 minutes. Last: 5:23 AM Pacific


  12:05 AM

The fundamental theme of the excellent movie Lost in Translation is, of course, being lost -- in work, in relationships, in life. This theme is illustrated implicitly by the technique of putting the characters into Tokyo and never providing any subtitles or other clues as to what's going on. Now and again the film makes the theme explict, and nowhere better than in the scene in which Bill Murray is being instructed by a director with flurries of Japanese, but whose words are rendered by the translator into directions like "with more ... intensity."

The humor depends on not understanding what the director is actually saying, so it's a bit of a spoiler (or just cheating) to hear a translation. But it's hard to resist. The Japanese blogger Xogij, who maintains the site Extraordinary Ordinary Guy in Japan[1], provides a translation of the Santori Time scene.

As an aside, the site is great, well worth exploring for insights into Japanese culture as both different and the same as ours.

Blog link from the ever-fascinating (and addictive)


[1] A slight spelling mistake, as he explains.

[categories]   ,

|