About

I'm Mike Pope. I live in the Seattle area. I've been a technical writer and editor for over 30 years. I'm interested in software, language, music, movies, books, motorcycles, travel, and ... well, lots of stuff.

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I look at it this way: I am a native speaker of English. I grew up in Northern New England. I went to Harvard. I know a bunch of languages. I have a Ph.D. Therefore my usage is standard. Your mileage may vary.

Bill Poser, writing about what constitutes "standard English."



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Blog Statistics

Dates
First entry - 6/27/2003
Most recent entry - 6/15/2018

Totals
Posts - 2502
Comments - 2574
Hits - 2,056,522

Averages
Entries/day - 0.46
Comments/entry - 1.03
Hits/day - 376

Updated every 30 minutes. Last: 9:13 AM Pacific


  12:05 AM

The fundamental theme of the excellent movie Lost in Translation is, of course, being lost -- in work, in relationships, in life. This theme is illustrated implicitly by the technique of putting the characters into Tokyo and never providing any subtitles or other clues as to what's going on. Now and again the film makes the theme explict, and nowhere better than in the scene in which Bill Murray is being instructed by a director with flurries of Japanese, but whose words are rendered by the translator into directions like "with more ... intensity."

The humor depends on not understanding what the director is actually saying, so it's a bit of a spoiler (or just cheating) to hear a translation. But it's hard to resist. The Japanese blogger Xogij, who maintains the site Extraordinary Ordinary Guy in Japan[1], provides a translation of the Santori Time scene.

As an aside, the site is great, well worth exploring for insights into Japanese culture as both different and the same as ours.

Blog link from the ever-fascinating (and addictive)


[1] A slight spelling mistake, as he explains.

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